Back to home
in Tips & Advice

What to Do With Your Easter Flowers

  • 04/21/2017
  • By Sarah
  • 0 Comments
What to Do With Your Easter Flowers

Easter has come and gone, but hopefully, your flowers are still around! If you’re anything like me (the complete opposite of possessing a green thumb), you might be wondering: now what?

The thing I love about Easter flowers is that they can be so much more than just a temporary holiday decoration. If you take the right steps, you can enjoy many of them for a long, long time!

Caring for Your Flowers 

When we say Easter flowers, this can refer to a number of varieties of flowers. Usually, these are either lilies, daffodils, tulips, azaleas, and hyacinths. More often than not, these tend to be sold and gifted as potted plants. If you have flower beds, this is good news for you: all of these potted flowers can be planted outdoors!

Typically, blooming Easter plants come with colorful foil wrapped around the pot. While this might look more attractive than the plastic pot, it’s important to cut a hole (or holes) in the bottom. Providing proper drainage is an important step in maintaining your plant’s health, as failure to do so may stunt its growth. (Use a plant saucer underneath the pot so water doesn’t leak onto your table!)

On the other hand, your plants will still need to be watered regularly. The soil should remain moist, but not flooded.

Are your flowers getting enough sunshine? If you’re planning on transplanting them outside, it’s best to keep the environment as close to outdoor-like as possible. An interior temperature between 65 to 75 degrees is ideal.

Transplanting

When it comes to Easter flowers, they’ve been forced to bloom in spring (thanks to a carefully simulated environment). However, with proper care, you may be able to get them to bloom a second time in the summer! Taking care of them while still in the pot is only step one.

If you want to replant your flowers outside, you’ll want to take additional preparations.

For one, you’ll want to cut the blooms from the stalk once they start to fade. Eventually, the leaves will turn yellow. At this point, start watering the plant less. Don’t completely cut back on watering, though–you don’t want the bulb to dry out! Moistening the soil every week should be sufficient.

Prior to planting, it’s best to keep the plant (in its pot) in a cool place that still receives a moderate amount of light. Once you’re certain that the risk of frost is all but gone, you can plant your plant!

grape hyacinth, hyacinth, easter flower, easter flowers, spring, transplanting

While all yards are different and receive various amounts of sun and shade, it’s best to choose a spot that receives a lot of sunlight. Ideally, your location of choice will have plenty of sun for the blooms and some shade for the roots. The best soil for these flowers is one that is rich and drains well.

When it comes to the actual planting, you can either plant the bulbs or the entire contents of the pot. If planting the bulbs only, the holes should be about a foot apart and at least 3 inches deep (with an additional 3 inches of soil on top).

If you want to plant the entire pot, you can (temporarily) place it in the ground until all the leaves completely die off. Then you can remove the plant and (gently) separate clumped roots. Bury it in the ground a little deeper than it was in the pot. Cover the roots and bulbs with soil.

When you’ve finished, thoroughly water the plant and then continue following the regular, recommended care for the variety of flower you have. Remember: not all plants are created equal.

Drying Bouquets

If potted plants aren’t your thing and/or instead you were gifted beautiful bouquets of fresh-cut Easter flowers, there are still ways to preserve them (and the memories that went along with them). Drying flowers and entire bouquets is a popular means to hang on to pretty keepsakes and fond memories (and not to mention creating vintage-inspired decor, too!). Reader’s Digest has 5 different ways to preserve a bouquet (you know, besides preserving petals between the pages of Shakespearean plays and Romantic poems).

dried flowers, easter flowers,


Remember: April showers bring May flowers!

Ever wonder where that phrase came from? Learn about it here!

By Sarah, 04/21/2017 Sarah is a content writer and social media assistant with a BA in literature/creative writing from Wilkes University. When she’s not spending her days at work writing, reading, and drinking coffee, she’s usually at home reading, writing, and drinking coffee. She also devotes a fair amount of time to HGTV, drawing, and doting on her dog. As a creator, Sarah believes in emphasizing personality through design and DIY projects.

Sarah

Sarah is a content writer and social media assistant with a BA in literature/creative writing from Wilkes University. When she’s not spending her days at work writing, reading, and drinking coffee, she’s usually at home reading, writing, and drinking coffee. She also devotes a fair amount of time to HGTV, drawing, and doting on her dog. As a creator, Sarah believes in emphasizing personality through design and DIY projects.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *