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History of Easter Egg Hunt and How to Throw Your Own, Last Minute

  • 04/14/2017
  • By Kayleigh
  • 0 Comments
History of Easter Egg Hunt and How to Throw Your Own, Last Minute

Spring has sprung and Easter is here! This year is flying by. I cannot believe we’re already halfway through the fourth month of 2017.

If you’re like me, you’re feeling the same way. But, you might also be trying to throw together a (really) last-minute gathering. There’s going to be kids, and there’s no better way to accommodate kids on Easter than throwing an Easter Egg Hunt.

Before I get into how to throw a memorable hunt with almost no time to plan, let’s talk a little about the history of the hunt.

On Your Mark… Get Set… Hunt!

The idea of an egg-laying bunny was brought to America by German immigrants. In the tales, it would deliver decorated eggs to children who were well-behaved. The day of delivery was Easter Sunday.

Rabbits are an ancient symbol of fertility and new life. It first arrived in America, some believe, in the 1700s, with German immigrants who settled right here in Pennsylvania.

Children would make nests for the bunny to lay the colored eggs. The story spread and developed across the country to include candy- and gift-giving, and decorated baskets replaced homemade nests. Carrots were soon left out for the bunny to take and power his world-wide hopping.

Eggs are an ancient symbol of new life, and Easter eggs likely stem from pagan traditions. Easter egg hunts are believed to have come about in a number of different ways.

It is believed that, in Scotland, it was tradition for children to go out on Easter Sunday in hunt of eggs and wild fowls for the morning’s breakfast. Furthermore, Martin Luther of the German church is believed to have encouraged egg hunting by organizing an event where men hid eggs for women and children to find.

Throwing Your Own Easter Egg Hunt

Alright, getting right down to it: you’ve been busy, but somewhere along the way you thought it’d be a good idea to host Easter this year. And it is. You can do it! With not very much time, here’s what you can do to add a little extra to your planned dinner—something else for your guest to take away and store in their memory bank.

Sometimes, egg hunts don’t last long, and if you don’t have a lot of time to set up they can last even less time.

One great way to add to the hunt is to work on an activity to do after. When you go out to buy plastic eggs for the hunt, grab a bag of candy and a puzzle. Align the number of pieces in a way that aligns with the number of children participating in the hunt. If there are 10 kids and 20 eggs, a 100 piece puzzle would mean each egg gets 5 pieces.

You can even print out coloring bookmarkers or Easter-themed cartoons, roll them into the eggs, and have the children color after the hunt is finished!

The children can work together to make the puzzle (while eating their candy) after they collect all the eggs. Doing this makes the entire experience last longer, eliminating the disappointment in those who don’t find the egg with the $20 in it… and saving you on that $20.

You can hold these hunts indoors, too. If you have guests with Springtime allergys—or if it’s raining on your Easter Sunday—you can still throw an egg hunt that everyone will remember.

Happy Hunting, and Happy Easter!


Sources:

http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/easter-symbols
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egg_hunt
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/happy-easter-whats-with-the-bunny-and-the-eggs/

By Kayleigh, 04/14/2017 Kayleigh is a content writer with a BA in technical writing/literature and an MA in creative writing. When she’s not at work writing, she’s at home writing, reading, or binge-watching television shows… for research, of course. A big do-it-yourselfer and crafter, Kayleigh loves testing out projects and gifting them to friends and family—all in preparation for when she owns her own home one day and decorates with her own personal creations. Her work has appeared on The Writing Cooperative and as an Honorable Mention in East Meets West American Writers Review.

Kayleigh

Kayleigh is a content writer with a BA in technical writing/literature and an MA in creative writing. When she’s not at work writing, she’s at home writing, reading, or binge-watching television shows… for research, of course. A big do-it-yourselfer and crafter, Kayleigh loves testing out projects and gifting them to friends and family—all in preparation for when she owns her own home one day and decorates with her own personal creations. Her work has appeared on The Writing Cooperative and as an Honorable Mention in East Meets West American Writers Review.

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