Back to home
in Buyers, Tips & Advice

How to Buy Local When Local is New to You

  • 07/10/2017
  • By Kayleigh
  • 0 Comments
How to Buy Local When Local is New to You

If you’re new to your area, buying local is a great way to get out and learn more about the area you moved to!

But, if you’re totally new to the area, you might not be sure where to start. Moving can be overwhelming, but learning about town events is easier than you think! Here are some tips to get you started.

Why You Should Do It

The first questions you might be asking yourself if why. Well, there are a few good reasons.

First of all, you’re supporting local people. A lot of the people who sell at local events do this for a living. They care about what they do. They put quality time into crafting their products and they pick their crops at the peak of their freshness, selling them soon after. This leads me right into my next point…

You know where it’s coming from. You’re looking at the people who grow, make, harvest, and transport the products you’re buying. This often means they are better quality products. You’ll see, feel, and taste the difference when you buy local.

This food and these products likely haven’t traveled far. The more you interact with these sellers, the more likely you are to become friends with them! They might not be your direct neighbors, but building relationships with them is something you can’t do when you buy online or at a chain store.

Buying local means you’re getting to know the people who you’re buying from, and it’s a great way to get involved with the local community. A lot of communities are proud of the work done by locals, and becoming a part of that will help you transition into life in your new neighborhood.

How to Find Out About Them

When you’re new to a town, learning about these events might seem difficult. But it’s easier than you might think!

Look for fliers posted around town. This is a great place to start—as you’re exploring the streets and stores of your new home, you’ll spot these all over the place.

Another great resource is social media. Look for Facebook events near you. These might be local yard sales, Farmer’s Markets, or even massive store sales.

Visit or call your local borough or township. It’s likely that you’ll need to stop by your municipal building a time or two after your move—whether it be for garbage bags or a construction permit—so ask them questions!

These people know a lot about what’s going on in town and will be happy to share what they know with you. If you’re looking to get involved yourself, they can even point you in the direction of the person you need to get in touch with.

Be sure to also check local newspapers, and subscribe to them! By subscribing to their publication you’re helping out a local company, and you’ll get local information delivered to your door regularly. It’s a win-win all around.

If you have any tips for buying local, let us know in the comments below!

By Kayleigh, 07/10/2017 Kayleigh is a content writer with a BA in technical writing/literature and an MA in creative writing. When she’s not at work writing, she’s at home writing, reading, or binge-watching television shows… for research, of course. A big do-it-yourselfer and crafter, Kayleigh loves testing out projects and gifting them to friends and family—all in preparation for when she owns her own home one day and decorates with her own personal creations. Her work has appeared on The Writing Cooperative and as an Honorable Mention in East Meets West American Writers Review.

Kayleigh

Kayleigh is a content writer with a BA in technical writing/literature and an MA in creative writing. When she’s not at work writing, she’s at home writing, reading, or binge-watching television shows… for research, of course. A big do-it-yourselfer and crafter, Kayleigh loves testing out projects and gifting them to friends and family—all in preparation for when she owns her own home one day and decorates with her own personal creations. Her work has appeared on The Writing Cooperative and as an Honorable Mention in East Meets West American Writers Review.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *