Back to home
in Exterior, Interior

Characteristics of an American Craftsman Home

  • 08/11/2017
  • By Sarah
  • 0 Comments
Characteristics of an American Craftsman Home

If you’re looking for a traditional home that just screams 20th-century American values, you can’t go wrong with a Craftsman style home.

These homes often appear on home renovation shows, particularly those in the southern United States. They’re often found needing a lot of love–but just bursting with charm. They’re an ideal home style for anyone looking for the perfect combination of simplicity and beautiful craftsmanship–they’re craftsman, after all.

The History of Craftsman Homes

The American Craftsman Home was a result of the American Arts and Crafts movement. This movement, partly influenced by the British A&C movement, was a domestic architectural, interior design, landscape design, applied arts, and decorative arts style and lifestyle philosophy that started in the late 19th century. The movement encouraged originality, a simplicity of form, use of local natural materials, and the visibility of handicraft. The American movement differed from the British movement with its goal of creating modest homes for a rapidly expanding American middle class.

The architectural development of these homes is traceable to changes in taste and the shift from the upper-to middle-class homeowner. More specifically, these homes were a shift away from Victorian-style architecture. The large bays, turrets, and rear wing common in Victorians were removed. Architects moved the kitchen into the main home with easy sight lines to the main living areas and back yard. This was to better serve the suburban middle-class American housewife and family. They also eliminated the butler’s pantry in favor of dining room cabinetry that often included built-ins. These built-ins were functional and provided character by enabling designers to incorporate wood and glass craftsmanship. The inclusion of built-in breakfast nook in the kitchen also served the family lifestyle shift. The kitchen became the heart of the family’s daily life. It became a gathering place.

The decline and end of the arts and crafts movement differ depending on your source. However, its decline was markedly significant by 1919. Despite effectively ending, America continued to feel the A&C design effects through the 1930s. Americans continued to build craftsman homes but typically modified them.

American interest in the A&C movement experienced a rebirth in the 1990s. The Pacific Northwestern ideals of healthy living and healthy trends once again inspired simple, clean, and natural homes.

Characteristics of a Craftsman Home

A&C designers typically frowned upon the thoughtless collection and display of objects if they were not useful or connected to the environment. This was the antithesis of the Victorian Bric-à-brac. Instead, craftsman homes embrace simplicity, handiwork, and natural materials–this is why people typically consider them cozy. If you’re a fan of the hygge home trend, a craftsman home might be for you!

As part of their craftsmanship and charm, craftsman homes often have shingle siding and stone details. Open porches with overhanging beams and rafters, projecting eaves, and a low-pitched gable roof are common characteristics. The home’s structural components tend to be visible, especially around the corners of the home and the gables, which often feature decorative trim. Plenty of windows allow for an abundance of natural light.

Built-ins are a common feature found in Craftsman homes

Other common features of craftsman homes include

  • Tapered, square columns supporting roof
  • 4-over-1 or 6-over-1 double-hung windows
  • Frank Lloyd Wright design motifs
  • Hand-crafted stone or woodwork
  • Mixed materials throughout structure
  • Symmetrical

Bungalows are a common form of craftsman-style. They are often one-and-a-half stories high with low-pitched roofs, shallow shed dormers, and deep porches. The ranch-style home evolved from the California bungalow. Ranch homes fit in with the landscape of more places because of their more generic style.

Is a craftsman home not your style? What about another American classic, the Cape Cod-style home? 


 

Sources:

http://www.craftsmanperspective.com/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Craftsman

By Sarah, 08/11/2017 Sarah is a content writer and social media assistant with a BA in literature/creative writing from Wilkes University. When she’s not spending her days at work writing, reading, and drinking coffee, she’s usually at home reading, writing, and drinking coffee. She also devotes a fair amount of time to HGTV, drawing, and doting on her dog. As a creator, Sarah believes in emphasizing personality through design and DIY projects.

Sarah

Sarah is a content writer and social media assistant with a BA in literature/creative writing from Wilkes University. When she’s not spending her days at work writing, reading, and drinking coffee, she’s usually at home reading, writing, and drinking coffee. She also devotes a fair amount of time to HGTV, drawing, and doting on her dog. As a creator, Sarah believes in emphasizing personality through design and DIY projects.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *